Events

Featured Events

Seminar Series

Free and open to the public, lunchtime lecture series hosts top national experts in bioethics

Ethics for Lunch

Monthly discussion at Johns Hopkins Hospital about an important clinical ethics issue

Jan 27
12:00 pm - 1:15 pm

Healthcare architecture has strongly advocated for patient-centered design, but can the resulting concealment of clinical spaces devalue the role of medical professionals? With a recent paradigm shift towards design quality measurement, has the social responsibility of health architects changed? Obligations to develop an ethically-based framework to structure design decisions and allocation discussions in healthcare architecture are explored.

Johns Hopkins Hospital, Zayed 2117
Jan 27
12:00 pm - 1:30 pm
Bloomberg School of Public Health Feinstone Hall
Feb 6
4:30 pm - 6:00 pm

Brin Lecture
Dr. Joseph Fins

Feb 10
12:00 pm - 1:15 pm

Prisons and jails in the United States have become de facto mental healthcare institutions. Approximately half of the 2.2 million incarcerated individuals have a mental disorder, and 20 percent have a serious mental illness such as schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, or major depressive disorder. Dr. Sisti will review the origins of this public health crisis and present findings from his team’s conceptual and empirical bioethics research. He will describe the ethical double-binds faced by clinicians who work to provide high-quality behavioral healthcare to this vulnerable population and suggest policy remedies to meet these challenges.

Bloomberg School of Public Health Feinstone Hall
Feb 24
12:00 pm - 1:15 pm

Fifty percent of women with Medicaid who desire postpartum sterilization are unable to receive one, and almost half of these women become pregnant in the subsequent year. Using normative, qualitative, and quantitative observational analyses, Dr. Arora investigates this disparity between women with private versus Medicaid insurance that exists, in part, due to federal policy aimed at reducing coercion and enhancing informed consent. Balancing ethical goals and clinical evidence, she advocates for policy change that is evidence-based and just.

Johns Hopkins Hospital, Zayed 2117
Mar 9
12:00 pm - 1:15 pm

‘Moral distress’ is a term originally coined to refer to the suffering, frustration, and outrage of nurses who found themselves compromising their own integrity under conditions of institutional constraint and duress.  It is now recognized as a growing reality for clinicians across clinical disciplines and roles.  While the “epidemic” of moral distress poses serious challenges both to clinician well-being and to the quality of clinical care, moral distress is also a call of conscience that signals genuine investment in moral standards and commitments. It thus has great potential, if properly worked with and directed, to motivate and inform moral reform.  This talk will explore both key challenges and important forms of positive potential held by moral distress, highlighting the need for responsive environments, in which claims of moral distress are heard and given ‘uptake,’ not as a mere expressions of individual suffering, but as significant and hopeful forms of moral protest.

Johns Hopkins Hospital, Zayed 2117
Mar 23
12:00 pm - 1:15 pm

Can agriculture save the planet before it destroys it?
Jack A. Bobo

Bloomberg School of Public Health Feinstone Hall
Apr 13
12:00 pm - 1:30 pm
Bloomberg School of Public Health Feinstone Hall
Apr 21
12:00 pm - 1:15 pm
Johns Hopkins Hospital, Zayed 2117
Apr 27
12:00 am

Lecture Title TBA
Lisa S. Parker, PhD

Bloomberg School of Public Health Feinstone Hall

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