Carleigh Krubiner, PhD

Associate Faculty
CV

Carleigh Krubiner’s research interests include resource allocation and priority-setting for health, ethical research addressing women’s health needs surrounding pregnancy, the design of health incentive programs such as conditional cash transfers (CCTs), health systems strengthening in low- and middle-income countries, and social justice theory.

Carleigh is currently leading work with colleagues in South Africa on the design and testing of an ethics framework for health priority setting under the envisioned National Health Insurance (NHI) – a tool and process that aims to ensure decisions about the inclusion or exclusion of new health technologies in the South African benefits package are ethically justifiable and informed by local values. The South African Values and Ethics for Universal Health Coverage (SAVE-UHC) Project  is a unique 3-year research project funded by the Wellcome Trust bringing together a variety of country stakeholders from national and provincial government, patient advocacy groups, medical associations, civil society organisations, private insurers, and academic institutions to guide the future of health priority-setting for NHI in South Africa. Read more here.

 Carleigh has also led work developing actionable, consensus-driven ethics guidance on how to equitably include the interests of pregnant women and their offspring in vaccine R&D for priority pathogens and emerging epidemic threats. The Pregnancy Research Ethics for Vaccines, Epidemics, and New Technologies (PREVENT) Project has developed two sets of guidance: the first specific to the Zika crisis (Pregnant Women & the Zika Virus Vaccine Research Agenda: Ethics Guidance on Priorities, Inclusion, and Evidence Generation) and the second addressing the broader context of emerging and re-emerging pathogens (Pregnant Women & Vaccines Against Emerging Epidemic Threats: Ethics Guidance on Preparedness, Research & Response). Together, these guidances provide a roadmap for the ethically responsible, socially just, and respectful inclusion of the interests of pregnant women in the development and deployment of vaccines against emerging pathogens.

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Prior to joining the Johns Hopkins Berman Institute of Bioethics as faculty, Carleigh worked as a Senior Program Officer and Research Associate at Results for Development Institute in Washington, DC, leading work on the development of health benefits policies in low- and middle-income countries, incorporating equity strategies and indicators into USAID’s Maternal and Child Survival Program, and examining resource allocation for the AIDS response in developing nations through the aids2031 Costs and Financing Project. Prior to that, Carleigh worked as a Research Associate at the Advisory Board Company, providing customized research reports on best practices for hospitals surrounding clinical quality and operational efficiency.

Carleigh earned her PhD in Health Policy and Management at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, where she was a Sommer Scholar. She received her BA in the History & Sociology of Science from the University of Pennsylvania.

Research Interests

  • Resource allocation and priority-setting for health
  • Ethical research addressing women’s health needs surrounding pregnancy
  • The design of health incentive programs such as conditional cash transfers
  • Health systems strengthening in low- and middle-income countries
  • Social justice theory

Education

  • B.A., History & Sociology of Science, University of Pennsylvania
  • Ph.D., Health Policy and Management, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health